Change volume settings in Windows Media Player


You have several options for controlling volume in Windows Media Player, including adjusting the volume level, muting, or reducing volume differences either within a song or between songs. Note that other software and hardware controls can affect the volume and audio effects settings in the Player.

If you encounter problems, try adjusting your Windows audio settings, the physical controls on your speakers, subwoofer (speaker for bass audio frequencies), or amplifier; or the settings in any other software used to configure the sound card in your computer. For information about how to adjust the speaker volume in Windows, see Adjust the sound level on your computer.

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To adjust or mute volume

  • To increase or decrease the volume level in the Player, move the Volume slider Picture of the Volume slider. To mute the volume, click the Mute button Picture of the Mute button. To restore audio, click the Mute button again.

To reduce volume differences within a song

You can avoid sharp volume changes in a piece of music by using Quiet mode, which reduces the difference between the loudest and softest sounds. This feature is available only with files that were encoded using the Windows Media Audio 9 or Windows Media Audio 10 Lossless and Professional codecs.

  1. In Now Playing mode, right-click an open space in the Player (such as to the left of the Stop button), point to Enhancements, and then click Quiet mode.

    If you’re currently in the Player Library, click the Switch to Now Playing button Picture of the Switch to Now Playing button in the lower-right corner of the Player.
  2. Click the Turn on link, and then do one of the following:

    • For a smaller difference between loud and soft sounds, click Medium difference.

    • For the smallest difference between loud and soft sounds, click Little difference.

  3. To hide the settings, click the Close button Picture of the Enhancements Close button in the Quiet mode dialog box.

    For more information about Now Playing mode, see Getting started with Windows Media Player.

To reduce volume differences between songs

If your songs play at different volume levels, you can have the Player level out (also called normalize) the volume for you so that you don't have to manually adjust the volume when a new song starts. The Player does so by reading a volume-leveling value in the audio file, and then adjusting the volume accordingly during playback.

Volume leveling is available only with files that are in Windows Media Audio (WMA) or MP3 format and contain a volume-leveling value. This value is automatically added to the files that are created during the ripping process. In addition, you can add this value to files on your computer that you have added to your Player Library. Adding the value doesn't change either the quality of a file or how the file plays in other players or portable media devices. Here's how to turn on volume leveling:

  1. In Now Playing mode, right-click an open space in the Player (such as to the left of the Stop button), point to Enhancements, and then click Crossfading and auto volume leveling.

    If you’re currently in the Player Library, click the Switch to Now Playing button Picture of the Switch to Now Playing button in the lower-right corner of the Player.
  2. Click the Turn on Auto Volume Leveling link.

    To add the volume-leveling value to a file, play the entire file with auto-leveling turned on. The Player will then level the volume for that file whenever you play it in the future.

  3. To hide the settings, click the Close button Picture of the Close button in the Crossfading and auto volume leveling dialog box.

    For more information about Now Playing mode, see Getting started with Windows Media Player.