Startup Repair: frequently asked questions


Here are answers to some common questions about Startup Repair.

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What is Startup Repair?

Startup Repair is a Windows recovery tool that can fix certain system problems that might prevent Windows from starting. Startup Repair scans your computer for the problem and then tries to fix it so your computer can start correctly.

Startup Repair is one of the recovery tools in the System Recovery Options menu. This set of tools is located on your computer's hard disk and on the Windows installation disc.

Note

  • You can also create a system repair disc that contains the System Recovery Options menu. For more information, see Create a system repair disc.

How do I use Startup Repair?

If a startup problem is detected, Startup Repair will start automatically and try to fix the problem.

If the problem is severe enough that Startup Repair doesn't start on its own and you can't access the System Recovery Options menu on your computer's hard disk, you can get to the menu and start Startup Repair by using the Windows installation disc or a system repair disc that you created earlier. For more information, see What are the system recovery options in Windows 7?

Note

  • If you use a Tablet PC or other computer with a touchscreen, you might need to connect a keyboard and mouse in order to use Startup Repair and the other tools in the System Recovery Options menu.

Are there problems that Startup Repair can't fix?

Startup Repair can only fix certain problems, such as missing or damaged system files. It can't fix hardware failures, such as a failing hard disk or incompatible memory, nor does it protect against virus attacks.

Startup Repair isn't designed to fix Windows installation problems, nor is it a backup tool, so it can't help you recover personal files, such as photos or documents. To help protect your computer, back up your system and files regularly. For more information, search for "backup" in Windows Help and Support.

What if Startup Repair can't fix my problem?

If repairs aren't successful, you'll see a summary of the problem and links to contact information for support. Your computer manufacturer might include additional assistance information. For more information, see What are the system recovery options in Windows 7?